the art history log

history and art history major, think of this as my study guide for the arts.
fleurdulys:

Portrait of Edith Schiele in a Striped Dress - Egon Schiele
1915

fleurdulys:

Portrait of Edith Schiele in a Striped Dress - Egon Schiele

1915

(via b1llycrystals)

deadpaint:

Valentin Serov, Portrait of Izabella Grunberg (1910)

deadpaint:

Valentin Serov, Portrait of Izabella Grunberg (1910)

(via thefireinsideyourmouth)

kutxx:

2.
Kees van Dongen
La Quiétude
1918, oil on canvas

kutxx:

2.

Kees van Dongen

La Quiétude

1918, oil on canvas

(via b1llycrystals)

b1llycrystals:

gandalf1202:

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres - Grande Odalisque [1814] on Flickr.
This eclectic mix of styles, combining classical form with Romantic themes, prompted harsh criticism when it was first shown in 1814. Critics viewed Ingres as a rebel against the contemporary style of form and content. When the painting was first shown in the Salon of 1819, one critic remarked that the work had “neither bones nor muscle, neither blood, nor life, nor relief, indeed nothing that constitutes imitation”. This echoed the general view that Ingres had disregarded anatomical realism. Ingres instead favoured long lines to convey curvature and sensuality, as well as abundant, even light to tone down the volume. Ingres continued to be criticised for his work until the mid-1820s. [Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 88.9 x 162.56 cm]


my only beef is that odalisques were usually women of color but i love that ingres loved backs so much that he painted them extra long. it’s been proven that this woman in particular, if she was real, would have 2 or 3 more vertebrae than a normal human being and wouldn’t be capable of standing up, like her back wouldn’t be able to support it. anyway i hope to see this work of art in person and cry right then and there.

b1llycrystals:

gandalf1202:

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres - Grande Odalisque [1814] on Flickr.

This eclectic mix of styles, combining classical form with Romantic themes, prompted harsh criticism when it was first shown in 1814. Critics viewed Ingres as a rebel against the contemporary style of form and content. When the painting was first shown in the Salon of 1819, one critic remarked that the work had “neither bones nor muscle, neither blood, nor life, nor relief, indeed nothing that constitutes imitation”. This echoed the general view that Ingres had disregarded anatomical realism. Ingres instead favoured long lines to convey curvature and sensuality, as well as abundant, even light to tone down the volume. Ingres continued to be criticised for his work until the mid-1820s.

[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas, 88.9 x 162.56 cm]

my only beef is that odalisques were usually women of color but i love that ingres loved backs so much that he painted them extra long. it’s been proven that this woman in particular, if she was real, would have 2 or 3 more vertebrae than a normal human being and wouldn’t be capable of standing up, like her back wouldn’t be able to support it. anyway i hope to see this work of art in person and cry right then and there.

expressionismus:

Emil Nolde citronlunden 1933

expressionismus:

Emil Nolde citronlunden 1933

artmastered:

El Trovador by Rufino Tamayo, 1945

artmastered:

El Trovador by Rufino Tamayo, 1945

(via playcousin-deactivated20140410)

poboh:

Still Life with Sunflowers, Boris Grigoriev. Russian (1886 - 1939)

poboh:

Still Life with Sunflowers, Boris Grigoriev. Russian (1886 - 1939)

(via deadniggastorage)

german-expressionists:

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Dancing Girls in Colourful Rays, 1932-1937 

german-expressionists:

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Dancing Girls in Colourful Rays, 1932-1937 

(via deadniggastorage)

unhistorical:

Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918)

I can paint and draw. I believe this myself and a few other people say that they believe this too. But I’m not certain of whether it’s true. 

(via deadwildcat)